TTT: Grandma’s Parsnips & Crackling Bread

Sound kinda weird? Welcome to a historical society cookbook, full of ‘natural’ cough syrups, dirt soaps, Jerky, Opal’s peanut brittle, Squrriel stew & tips & tricks on how to get your pie dough to come out perfectly every time.
One of the best things to hunt for at flea markets, resale shops, grandma’s basement & your great aunt’s third-cousin’s twice-removed widowed sister’s kitchen. They combine common sense, forgotten vocabulary (oleo, sugar twin, Tiny tots, accent)!), & simply mouth watering homestyle recipes.

A Tribute to all people who’ve never written recipes down & just tell you to add a little til it looks right, I’ve included two great heritage historical cookbook recipes!

MamMaw Loftice Cinnamon Toast
6 slices white bread
Sugar, butter, cinnamon

Directions: My mama would cover each slice of bread with homemade butter, then cover with white sugar. Sprinkle with cinnamon. Cook in a slow oven until toasted.
*My grandmother used Crisco, since it’s crunch better!

Sugar-Curing Meat
1000 lb. Meat
20 qt. Medium salt
5 lb. Brown sugar
1/2 lb saltpeter
1 lb. Black pepper
Cayenne pepper

Directions: Good luck!

Old cookbooks have a sense of purpose, being & of course humour. Some are covered in notes, failures, & stars to repeat the meal because it was such a hit. There’s something wonderful about knowing you’re the 5th generation cooking something that your great-grandmother loved as a child. A sense of connection to past people in places not so far away.

Go find yourself an old cookbook & read up on your history!

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